Welcome Spring, Welcome Mooshroom

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Technically, not Spring yet, but our first calf has arrived.  Brent’s been suffering from calving withdrawal, so it’s nice to get these babies out and tagged.  Her name is Mooshroom ( a Minecraft ref ).  If you don’t know what Minecraft is, don’t worry, it’s still a cute name.

 

Our piggies have moved to a new pad.  They worked the soil well and it was great to get them on to a new project.  Here they are when they first arrived.

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Then they did this.  Ready for veggie patch preparations.
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We moved them here.  I say, “moved,”  but it wasn’t easy.  The three big boys followed the bucket and totally got it.  Yum, new grass.  The two little ones were tentative venturing out to a new paddock with fresh food.  They wanted to stay put, live in mom’s garage, lay on the couch and play video games.  We are used to herding animals.  They are fantastic.  Even when things get crazy, you can move a herd like a magic pen on a Magnadoodle.

These two little piggies were very confused as were we.  “The grass is over there!”  “Pig, what ARE you doing?”  We said.  Finally, we lifted the fence and let them slowly, slowly nudge and munch their way to the new paddock.  Crazy pigs.

This morning, they were sunbathing and enjoying their new digs.

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Milk Nose and Ear Tags

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After a calf has a feed, they get milk nose.  Milk all over their face.  They really get into feeding.  They butt their mother’s udders with their head and then feed.  I’ve fed a bottle calf before, you must watch out because they will butt you too.  They’ll butt anything to get more milk.

Brent tagged another calf today.  Can you see him?  He’s in the middle of a curious herd.  Don’t try this at home.  He has a technique.  A technique based on a foundation of calm.  If you are calm, then they are calm.  We’ve tried other ways of tagging a calf that were successful, but this year has been smooth.  He also castrates the boys as well.

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I’m not a fan of tagging calves.  It can be dangerous.  Have you seen those horns?  But regulations say we have to.  In France, you tag both ears.  I see that America has gotten off easy with one ear tag.  If you don’t tag the calf the first day, you will never catch it.  I believe there are rodeo events based on this principle.

Hey!

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Calf doing “hay” face.  The calves, confused, wander about copying the herd.  They put their nose to the ground as the herd munches on fresh grass.  They munch the hay because that’s what everyone else seems to be doing.  But the hay doesn’t go down as smoothly as mum’s milk.  Then, they make this face.

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Brent strategically lays the hay out so that each ball rolls downhill.  Tomorrow’s morning bale will be a bit uphill.  He can do it.

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With all this warm sunshine and fresh grass and hay, the herd has been very calm.  They do enjoy sunbathing.

We are expecting one more calf this month.  After, the rest of the gang shall pop out in March and April.

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Boy Unexpected

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We thought they might come early.   “Large Marge” is oh so fertile.  A ‘J’ boy  he might be Jegun, he might be Jesus … our ‘J’ names have suddenly alt-tabbed their way to importance.  He is tagged and castrated ( nice tag work, Gary! Next time the balls? ).  Despite my husband’s cold/flu deal, that youngun was sorted.  It’s tough with Salers,  If you don’t catch them the first day, it may be too late..  I can’t believe we are here already.  Are we here?  With the calves?  Our ‘i’ calves are still so young.  Little, silly babies.  No, we are here.  Our Gremlin bubs will arrive soon.  Little Jesus is proof.  ( yes, yes I  know …. no Jesus.  Jagger?  Jimmy Ricard? )